Dr. Ning Lu  | Associate Professor

100-29 Keystone
Campus Box 7911
NC State University
Raleigh, NC 27695-7911 
(Office) 919-513-7529
Email: nlu2@ncsu.edu

Biography

Dr. Lu has over 19 years of experience in electric power engineering. From 2003 to 2012, Dr. Ning Lu was a senior research engineer with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. She was a substation design engineer with the Shenyang Electric Power Survey and Design Institute from 1993 to 1998. She has conducted and managed research projects in modeling and analysis of power system load behaviors, wide area energy storage management systems, renewable integration, climate impact on power grids, and smart grid modeling and diagnosis. Dr. Lu is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. She has authored or co-authored more than 60 publications, including journal articles, conference proceedings, and technical reports.

Education

  • 2002 – Ph.D. in Electric Power Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York
  • 1999 – M.S. in Electric Power Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York
  • 1993 – B.Eng. in Electrical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang, China

Professional Affiliations

Senior Member, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2005

President, North American Chinese Power Professional Association, 2011-2013

Secretary, Climate Change Technology Subcommittee, Energy Development & Power Generation Committee, Power and Energy Society, 2008 – present

Secretary, System Economic Subcommittee, Power System Analysis, Computing, and Economics Committee, Power and Energy Society, 2009 – present

Chair, Business Models for Energy Storage Applications Working Group, System Economic Subcommittee, Power System Analysis, Computing, and Economics Committee, Power and Energy Society, 2011

Core Team Member, DOE Energy Storage System Working Group, 2012

Guest Editor, special issues on energy storage, IEEE transactions on smart grid, 2012

Guest Editor, Special Issue on Control Theory and Technology, IEEE transactions on smart grid, 2012

Editor, IEEE transactions on smart grid, 2013

Member, American Society for Engineering Education (ASSE), 2013

 

Professional Experience

January 2013–   Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept., North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.
Associate Professor.

March 2003– Sept 2012   Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA.
Senior Research Engineer. Manage and conduct research projects in electrical transmission and distribution with a focus on load modeling and control, energy storage, smart grid information management system, and renewable integration.

Major Projects

•      DOE: Energy Storage System Working Group [2012  ] Develop an initial protocol for measuring and reporting the performance of energy storage systems through a collaborative activity by interested stakeholders.

•      Integrated Smart Distribution R&D [2011 – Sept. 2012] Develop power system load models based on smart meter measurements. Manage and forecast demand response.

•      A Centralized Load Controller for a Hybrid Demand Response System [2011 – Sept. 2012] Develop a centralized control algorithm that can be used at community or substation level to control thermostatically controlled appliances (TCA) (e.g. water heaters or air conditioners) in an aggregated manner for ancillary service.

•      A Multi-layer, Data-driven Advanced Reasoning Tool [2011– Sept. 2012 ] Developed a decision support tool to improved power system operation.

•      Flow Battery Modeling [2011– Sept. 2012] Develop a dynamic performance model for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

•      Predictive Defense Model for the Smart Grid [2009 – 2011] Develop a predictive defense tool for the power grid operators to fully utilize the rich data provided by smart grid communication and sensor networks to diagnose and detect possible device failures, sabotage attempts, and cyber security threats.

•      Hybrid Energy Storage System [2009- 2011]  Developed a novel algorithm for hybrid energy storage systems for wind and solar integration. One Patent application initiated.

•      Airplane Energy System Efficiency Modeling [2010– 2011]

•      Wide Area Energy Storage Management System [2008–2010]  Evaluated the performance and economics of energy storage devices and load response programs to balance intermittent renewable generation resources.

•      Smart House [2008–2009] Developed household energy management system. One Patent application submitted.

•      Grid-friendly Device Modeling [2007–2009] Developed voltage and frequency responsive water heater models used for dynamic simulations of demand responsive programs for Bonneville Power Administration.

•      Generation Flexibility Study [2008–2009] Developed a novel wind error generator for stochastic unit commitment and wind integration studies.

•      Climate Impact on the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) System [2006–2010] Studied climate impacts on western power grid.

•      Areva Energy Management Systems (EMS) [2006–2008 ] Worked with the generation team of Areva T&D on various industry EMS development projects.

•      WECC Load Modeling Task Force [2004–2008] Developed load models for the study of transient stability, inter-area oscillatory dynamics, and voltage stability. Developed load component database.

•      Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit [2004–2006] Developed a SIMULINK-based model for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit for long-haul trucks.

•      Visual Mini-Grid [2004–2005] Developed an interactive power simulation package that simulates the operation of a distribution power grid, with a focus on simulating the operation of intelligent appliances of the residential load.

•      U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) GridWise [2003–2005] Developed control logic of grid-friendlyTM controllers for frequency-responsive grid-friendly appliances (GFAs) to help stabilize power grids and prevent outages.

•      DOE Science Grid [2004] Supported DOE science grid project in modeling the operation of the U.S. electric power distribution system with a focus on residential load simulation.

•      Electrical System Transformation Initiative (ESTI) Laboratory Directed Research & Development Project [2003-2004] Exploratory research toward price-responsive residential load modeling in electric power distribution networks.

•     Valuation of Security Benefit [2003] Developed a methodology to evaluate the security values added by renewable generations for military bases.

1993–98        Shenyang Electric Bureau, Shenyang City, Liaoning Province, P. R. China
Design engineer. Designed substations and distribution networks

Publications

Pending US Patents

1)      Lu, Ning, Pengwei DU, Xinxin GUO, Robert PRATT, and Donald Hammerstrom. “SCHEDULING AND MODELING THE OPERATION OF CONTROLLABLE AND NON-CONTROLLABLE ELECTRONIC DEVICES.” WIPO Patent 2011139949, issued November 11, 2011. Description available online at: https://www.google.com/patents/US20110270452

2)      Jin, Chunlian, Ning Lu, Shuai Lu, and Yuri V. Makarov. “CONTROLLER FOR HYBRID ENERGY STORAGE.” U.S. Patent Application 12/948,337, filed November 17, 2010. Description available online at: http://www.faqs.org/patents/app/20120119579#ixzz2Glp3YZ7m

3)      Lu, Ning, Yu Zhang, Pengwei Du, and Yuri V. Makarov. “Controller for thermostatically controlled loads.” U.S. Patent Application 13/452,340, filed April 20, 2012. Available online at: http://www.google.com/patents/US20130282181

A. Journal Publications:

[21]         Dan Wang, Hongjie Jia, Chengshan Wang, Ning Lu, Fan Menghua, Miao Weiwei, and Liu Zhe, “Performance evaluation of controlling thermostatically controlled appliances as virtual generators using comfort-constrained state-queueing models,” accepted by IET Generation, Transmission & Distribution, 2013.

[20]         Dan Wang, Shaoyun Ge, Hongjie Jia, Chengshan Wang, Yue Zhou, Ning Lu, and Xiangyu Kong, “A Demand Response and Battery Storage Coordination Algorithm for Providing Microgrid Tie-Line Smoothing Services,” accepted by IEEE Trans. On Sustainable Energy. 2013.

[19]          C. Jin, N Lu, S. Lu, Y Makarov, and R.A. Dougal, “A Coordinating Algorithm for Dispatching Regulation Services Between Slow and Fast Power Regulating Resources,” IEEE Trans. on Smart Grid. October, 2013.

[18]         N Lu and M Vanouni, “Passive energy storage using distributed electric loads with thermal storage,” Journal of Modern Power Systems and Clean Energy, 2013, DOI 10.1007/s40565-013-0033-z.

[17]         Y Zhang and N Lu, “Parameter Selection for a Centralized Thermostatically Controlled Appliances Load Controller Used for Intra-hour Load Balancing,” IEEE Trans. on Smart Grid, vol. 4, issue 4, November 2013

[16]         L. Zheng, N Lu, and L. Cai, “Reliable Wireless Communication Networks for Demand Response,” IEEE Trans. on Smart Grid, issue 99, pp. 1-8, 2012.

[15]         Chenshan Wang, Mengxuan Liu, and N Lu, “Micro-Grid Tie-line Power Smoothing using Demand Response Program,” Proceedings of the CSEE, No. 32, vol. 25, page 36-43 (中国电机工程学报2012年第32卷第25期 36-43页), 2012.

[14]         N Lu and Y Zhang, “Design Considerations of a Centralized Load Controller Using Thermostatically Controlled Appliances for Continuous Regulation Reserves,” IEEE Trans. on Smart Grid, issue 99, pp. 1-8, 2012.

[13]         N Lu, “An Evaluation of the HVAC Load Potential for Providing Load Balancing Service,” IEEE Trans.  Smart Grid, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 1263-1270, Sept. 2012.

[12]         P Du and N Lu. 2011. “Appliance Commitment for Household Load Scheduling,” IEEE Trans.  Smart Grid, issue 2, June 2011.

[11]         PE de Mello, N Lu, and YV Makarov. 2011. “An Optimized Autoregressive Forecast Error Generator,” Wind Energy,  DOI: 10.1002/we.460.

[10]         J. Kondoh, N. Lu, and D. J. Hammerstrom, “An evaluation of the water heater load potential for providing regulation service,” IEEE Trans. Power Syst., vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 1309–1316, Aug. 2011.

[9]           H Khurana, M Hadley, N Lu, and DA Frincke. 2010. “Building Security in Smart-Grid Security Issues.” IEEE Security & Privacy 8(1): 81­­­–85.

[8]           PC Wong, LR Leung, N Lu, MJ Scott, P Mackey, H Foote, J Correia Jr., ZT Taylor, J Xu, SD Unwin, and A Sanfilippo. 2009. “Designing a Collaborative Visual Analytics System to Support Social and Technological Change Prediction.” IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications 29(5):58–68, IEEE Computer Society Press, September 2009.

[7]           N Lu, ZT Talyor, W Jiang, J Correia, LYR Leung, and PC Wong. 2010. “Climate Change Impacts on Residential and Commercial Loads in the Western U.S. Grid.” IEEE Trans. on Power Systems 25: 480–488.

[6]           N Lu, JH Chow, and AA Desrochers. 2009. “Generator bidding strategies in a competitive electricity market with derating and bid-segment considerations.” International Journal of Electrical Power & Energy Systems 29(3):173-180.

[5]           N Lu, Q Li, X Sun, and MA Khaleel. 2006.The modeling of a standalone solid-oxide fuel cell auxiliary power unit.” Journal of Power Sources 161(2):938–948.

[4]           S. Katipamula and N. Lu, “Evaluation of residential HVAC control strategies for demand response programs,” ASHRAE Trans., vol. 1, no. 12, pp. 1–12, 2006.

[3]           N Lu, DP Chassin, and SE Widergren. 2005. “Modeling Uncertainties in Aggregated Thermostatically Controlled Loads Using a State Queueing Model.” IEEE Trans. on Power Systems 20: 725–733.

[2]           N. Lu and D. P. Chassin, “A state queueing model of thermostatically controlled appliances,” IEEE Trans. Power Syst., vol. 19, pp. 1666–1673, 2004.

[1]           N Lu, JH Chow, and AA Desrochers. 2004. “Pumped-Storage Hydro-Turbine Bidding Strategies in a Competitive Electricity Market.” IEEE Trans. on Power Systems 19:834-842.

B. Conference Papers:

[34]         M. Vanouni and N. Lu, “Performance Indices for Evaluating Demand Response Services Provided by Thermostatically Controlled Appliances,” accepted in Proc. 2005/2006 IEEE PES Transmiss. Distrib. Conf. Exhib., Apr. 2014.

[33]         M. Vanouni, Y. Zhang, P. Du, and N. Lu, “A Control Mechanism for a Hybrid Demand Response System Controlling Thermostatically Controlled Appliances,” Submitted to the Proc. IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting, 2014.

[32]         Ning Lu, Ruisheng Diao, Ryan P. Hafen, Nader Samaan and Yuri V. Makarov, “A Comparison of Forecast Error Generators for Modeling Wind and Load Uncertainty Proc. of the 2013 IEEE PES General Meeting, Vancouver,  Canada, 2013.

[31]         Y Zhang and N Lu, “Demand-side Management of Air Conditioning Cooling Loads for Intra-hour Load Balancing,” Proc. of IEEE Innovative Smart Grid Technologies 2013, , Washington DC, USA, 2013.

[30]         N Lu, P Du, X Guo, and FL Greitzer, “Smart Meter Data Analysis,” Proc. of the IEEE Transmission and Distribution Conference and Exposition 2012, Orlando, FL, USA, 2012.

[29]         N Lu, P Du, FL Greitzer, X Guo, RE Hohimer, and YG Pomiak, “A Multi-layer, Data-driven Advanced Reasoning Tool for Intelligent Data Mining and Analysis for Smart Grids,” Proc. of the 2012 IEEE PES General Meeting, San Diego, CA, USA, 2012.

[28]         N Lu, P Du, and YV Makarov, “The Potential of Thermostatically Controlled Appliances for Intra-hour Energy Storage Applications,” Proc. of the 2012 IEEE PES General Meeting, San Diego, CA, USA, 2012.

[27]         YV Makarov, PV Etingov, NA Samaan, N Lu, J Ma, K Subbarao, P Du,  and LD Kannberg, “Improving Performance of Power Systems with Large-scale Variable Generation Additions,” Proc. of the 2012 IEEE PES General Meeting, San Diego, CA, USA, 2012.

[26]         YV Makarov, S Lu, NA Samaan, Z Huang,  K Subbarao, PV. Etingov, J Ma, RP Hafen, R Diao, and N Lu. “Integration of Uncertainty Information into Power System Operations,” Proc. of the 2011 IEEE PES General Meeting, Detroit, Michigan, USA, 2011

[25]         N Lu, P. Du, P. R. Paulson, F. Greitzer, X. Guo, and M. Hadley, “A Multi-layer, Hierarchical Information Management System for the Smart Grid.” Proc. of the 2011 IEEE PES General Meeting, Detroit, Michigan, USA, 2011

[24]        C Jin, N Lu, S Lu, YV Makarov, RA Dougal, “Novel Dispatch Algorithm for Regulation Service using a Hybrid Energy Storage System” Proc. of the 2011 IEEE PES General Meeting, Detroit, Michigan, USA, 2011

[23]         C Jin, S Lu, N Lu, RA Dougal, “Cross-Market Optimization for Hybrid Energy Storage Systems,” Proc. of the 2011 IEEE PES General Meeting, Detroit, Michigan, USA, 2011.

[22]         T. B. Nguyen, N. Lu, and C. Jin, “Modeling Impacts of Climate Change Mitigation Technologies on Power Grids.”  Proc. of the 2011 IEEE PES General Meeting, Detroit, Michigan, USA, 2011

[21]         N Lu, P. Du, P. R. Paulson, F. Greitzer, X. Guo, and M. Hadley, “The Development of a Smart Distribution Grid Testbed for Integrated Information Management Systems.” Proc. of IEEE Innovative Smart Grid Technologies 2011, Anaheim, CA, USA, 2011.

[20]         N Lu, MR Weimar, YV Makarov, and C Loutan. 2010. “An Evaluation of the NaS Battery Storage Potential for Providing Regulation Service in California.” Proc. of the 2011 IEEE PSCE, Phoenix, Arizona.

[19]         N Lu, MR Weimar, YV Makarov, FJ Rudolph, SN Murthy, J Arseneaux, and C Loutan, “An Evaluation of the Flywheel Potential for Providing Regulation Service in California.” In: Proc. of the 2010 IEEE PES General Meeting, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2010.

[18]         S Lu, YV Makarov, Y Zhu, N Lu, K Prakash, C Nirupama, and B Bhujanga, “Unit Commitment Considering Generation Flexibility and Environmental Constraints.” In: Proc. of the 2010 IEEE PES General Meeting, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, 2010.

[17]         LR Leung, N Lu, TZ Taylor, W Jiang, J Correia, and P Wong. 2010. “Climate Change Impacts on Residential and Commercial Loads in the Western U.S. Grid.” In: Proc. of first Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy 8th Users Forum on Weather and Climate Impacts, Atlanta, Georgia.

[16]         N Lu, PC Wong, L-Y Leung, M Scott, T Taylor, W Jiang, and J Correia. 2009. “The Impact of Climate Change on US Power Grids.” In: Proc. of the 2nd Climate Change Technology Conference, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

[15]         N Lu, ZT Talyor, W Jiang, J Correia, LYR Leung, and PC Wong. 2008. “The Temperature Sensitivity of the Residential Load and Commercial Building Load.” In: Proc. of the 2009 IEEE PES General Meeting, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

[14]         N Lu, B Yang, Z Huang, and R Bravo. 2008. “The System Impact of Air-Conditioner Under-voltage Protection Schemes.” In: Proc. of the IEEE Power System Conference and Exposition 2009, Seattle, Washington.

[13]         PC Wong, LR Leung, N Lu, M Paget, J Correia Jr., W Jiang, P Mackey, ZT Taylor, YL Xie, J Xu, S Unwin, and A Sanfilippo. 2009. “Predicting the Impact of Climate Change on U.S. Power Grids and Its Wider Implications on National Security.” In: Proceedings AAAI Spring Symposium on Technosocial Predictive Analytics 2009, pages 148–153, Menlo Park, California, AAAI Press.

[12]         N Lu, F Puyleart, S Yang, Y Xie, and Z Huang. 2008. “Load Component Database of Household Appliances and Small Office Equipment.” In: Proc. of the 2008 IEEE PES General Meeting, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.

[11]         DJ Hammerstrom, N Lu, and N Zhou. 2007. “Controller design of power quality-improving appliances.” In: Proc. of the Power Elect. Specialists Conf. 2007, Orlando, Florida.

[10]         N Lu, Q Li, Y Xie, X Sun, B Koeppel, and MA Khaleel. 2007. “Dynamic Modeling in Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells Controller Design.” In: Proc. of the 2007 IEEE PES General Meeting, Tampa, Florida.

[9]           N Lu, X Sun, and MA Khaleel. 2006. “A Modeling and Experimental Framework for Controls for Fuel Cells.” In: Proc. of the 2006 Second International Symposium on Communications, Control and Signal Processing, Marrakech, Morocco.

[8]           N Lu and T Nguyen. 2005. “Grid FriendlyTM Appliances – Load-side Solution for Congestion Management.” In: Proc. of the IEEE Transmission and Distribution Conference and Exposition 2005, New Orleans, Louisiana.

[7]           N Lu and DJ Hammerstrom. 2005. Design Considerations for Frequency Responsive Grid FriendlyTM Appliances.” In: Proc. of the IEEE Transmission and Distribution Conference and Exposition 2005, New Orleans, Louisiana.

[6]           N Lu and S Katipamula. 2005. “Control Strategies of Thermostatically Controlled Appliances in a Competitive Electricity Market.” In: Proc. of 2005 IEEE PES General Meeting, San Francisco, California.

[5]           N Lu, ZT Taylor, DP Chassin, R Guttromson, and S Studham. 2005. “Parallel Computing Environments and Methods for Power Distribution System Simulation.” In: Proc. of 2005 IEEE PES General Meeting, San Francisco, California.

[4]           N Lu, DP Chassin, and SE Widergren. 2004. “Simulating Price Responsive Distributed Energy Resources.” In: Proc. of the IEEE Power System Conference and Exposition 2004, New York City, New York.

[3]           N Lu, JH Chow, and AA Desrochers. 2003. “Pumped-Storage Hydro-Turbine Bidding Strategies in a Competitive Electricity Market.” In: Proc. of IEEE 2003 PES General Meeting, Toronto, Canada.

[2]           N Lu, JH Chow, and AA Desrochers. 2002. “Generator Bidding Strategies in a Competitive Deregulated Market Accounting for Availability and Bid Segments.” In: Proc. of VIII Symposium of Specialists in Electric Operational and Expansion Planning, Brasilia, Brazil.

[1]           N Lu, JH Chow, and AA Desrochers. 2002. “A Multi-layer Petri Net Model for Deregulated Electric Power Systems.” In: Proc. of 2002 ACC, pp. 513-518, Anchorage, Alaska. Accepted as one of the five final papers for the 2002 ACC Best Student Paper Contest.

C.            Major Technical Reports:

[15]         B Lesieutre, R Bravo, DP Chassin, IA Hiskens, Z Huang, N Lu, G Venkataramanan, and R Yinger. Load Modeling Transmission Research. PNNL-19274. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington.

[14]         N Lu, YV Makarov, and MR Weimar. 2010. The Wide-area Energy Storage and Management System Phase 2 Final Report. PNNL-19720. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington.

[13]         N Lu, YV Makarov, MR Weimar, F Frank, S. Murthy, J. Arseneaux, C. Loutan, and S Chowdhury. 2010. The Wide-area Energy Storage and Management System (Phase 2): Interim Report (2) – Flywheel Field Tests. PNNL-19669, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington.

[12]         N Lu, D Hammerstrom, and S. Patrick. 2009. Grid FriendlyTM Device Model Development and Simulation. PNNL-18998, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington.

[11]         N Lu, MR Weimar, YV Makarov, J Ma, and VV Viswanathan. 2009. The Wide-Area Energy Storage and Management System – Battery Storage Evaluation. PNNL-18679, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington.

[10]         N Lu, P De Mello, and YV Makarov. 2008. CAISO Generation Flexibility Attributes Study Interim Report – CAISO Generation Flexibility Attributes Study Interim Report – Random Forecast Error Generator.  PNWD-4030, Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division, Richland, Washington.  [Limited Distribution]

[9]           N Lu, ZT Talyor, W Jiang, Y Xie, J Correia, LYR Leung, PS Mackey, PC Wong, and ML Paget. 2008. Climate Change Impacts on Residential and Commercial Loads in the Western U.S. Grid. PNNL-17826, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington.

[8]        N Lu, B Yang, and Z Huang. 2008. Evaluation of Southern California Edison Air-Conditioner Stalling Solutions. CEC/LMTF Load Research Program.  PNNL-17686, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington.

[7]        N Lu, YL Xie, and Z Huang. 2008. Air Conditioner Compressor Performance Model. CEC/LMTF Load Research Program. PNNL-17796, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington.

[6]           DP Chassin and N Lu. 2007. “Load Composition Data.” PNNL-SA-57496, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington.

[5]        Z Huang, B Lesieutre, S Yang, A Ellis, A Meklin, B Wong, A Gaikwad, D Brooks, DJ Hammerstrom, J Phillips, D Kosterev, M Hoffman, O Ciniglio, R Hartwell, P Pourbeik, A Maitra, and N Lu. 2007. Load Monitoring CEC/LMTF Load Research Program. PNNL-17110, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington.

[4]           DJ Hammerstrom, RT Guttromson, N Lu, PA Boyd, D Trudnowski, DP Chassin, CA Bonebrake, and JM Shaw. 2006. Beacon Detection in Electric Distribution Systems For Grid Friendly Operations. PNNL-15854, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington.

[3]           MA Khaleel, X Sun, BJ Koeppel, BN Nguyen, and N Lu. 2005. Modeling and Control of an SOFC APU. PNNL 15396, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington.

[2]           DP Chassin, A Gangopahyaya, S Katipamula, N Lu, J Malard, JV Mallow, C Posse. 2004. “Modeling Power Systems as Complex Adaptive Systems.” PNNL-14987, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington.

[1]           N Lu, WM Warwick, JG De Steese, SJ Arey, JE Dagle, DB Jarrell, and MR Weimar. 2003. Security Benefits of Renewable Generation: A Case Study.” Prepared for U.S. Air Force Civil Engineering Support Agency Headquarters, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida.

2015 Spring: ECE 792-019:  Computational Methods for Power System Analysis

 

Course Time: Tuesday & Thursday 2:20PM – 3:35PM

Room: 01228 Engineering Building 2

Office Hours:  Tuesday 4:00 – 6.00 pm, or by appointment

Course Description: This course is designed to introduce computational methods used for power grid operation and planning. The course will help students understand the various computational methods that form the basis of major commercial software packages used by grid analysts and operators. The students are expect to have some basic understanding of principles of power system analysis including power system models, power flow calculation, economic dispatch, reliable and stability analysis.  The course covers computational methods to solve linear systems and non-linear equations, unit commitment and economic dispatch considering renewable integration and demand response programs, and power system data analysis and applications.

Prerequisites:

ECE 451: Power System Analysis

ECE550: Power System Operation and Control

 Textbooks:

  1. Power Generation, Operation, and Control, A.J. Wood, B. F. Wollenberg, John Wiley & Sons
  2. Computational Methods for Electric Power Systems, M. L. Crow, CRC press References:
  3.  
  1. Fundamentals of Power System Economics, Daniel S. Kirschen, Goran Strbac, Wiley.Course Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic market operation process of deregulated electricity market
    • Bidding Process of the Wholesale Electricity Market
    • Day-ahead, hourly-ahead, and real-time scheduling and dispatch process
    • Retail electricity market pricing schemes
  • Develop computer programs to perform unit commitment and economic dispatch
    • Understand the basic optimization methods used in large power system operation
    • Modeling of power system load and integration of wind/solar/storage
  • Develop computer programs to solve power flow problems
    • Power flow, Decoupled Power Flow, Fast Decoupled Power Flow, DC Power Flow
    • PV Curves
  • Numerical Integration for Transient Stability Analysis
  • Understand some basic techniques used in advanced data analytics for
    • PMU Data Analysis
    • Smart Meter Data Analysis

 

Grading Policy:

There will be seven homework assignments, one research project, one midterm, and a final exam. The weight for each is as follows:  Homework: 14%;   Term Project: 24%;  Midterm: 22%;   Final: 40%.

 

Project Assignment

Purpose: Understand the basic techniques for Power System Planning Studies.

Software Requirement: PowerWorld and Matlab

 You will be divided into groups of 2 or 3 to conduct a research project modeling the renewable integration (PV or Wind or both) in a regional power system using PowerWorld and Matlab.

  1.  You can model the impact of integration of demand response (DR) program and the electric vehicle (EV) loads as well.
  2.  Please pay attention to the following deadlines:
    1. Send me your choice (PV, EV, DR, or Wind or a combination of those) by 1/15/2015.
    2. You will outline your team members and the modeling approach by 1/22/2015.
  3. You will present your selected IEEE system and what are the data you will use for setting up the modeling scenarios in class on 3/17/2015. The audience will ask questions and give you feedbacks.
  4.  Summarized your findings in a final report (Do not exceed 10 pages – conciseness is a virtue).  Suggested format for your final project: A brief Project Description (1 page), Technical Approach (methods used for Data Analysis) (2 page), Results (up to 4 pages) and Conclusions (1 page). Final Report is due 4/21/2015.
  5.  You will give a presentation in class on 4/23/2015 to present your final report.

Academic Integrity: Evidence of copying, including copying of source code, or any other use of unauthorized aid will be investigated and potentially referred to the University judicial system as a violation of the Code of Student Conduct. The minimum sanction for a violation is a zero on an assignment.

Fall 2014 – ECE 451 Power System Analysis

Course Time: Monday & Wednesday 8:05AM – 9:20AM

Course Description

The course will help students understand how power systems are modeled both at the distribution and transmission levels. The course covers long-distance transmission of electric power with emphasis on admittance and impedance modeling of components and system, power-flow studies and calculations, symmetrical and unsymmetrical fault calculations, economic operation of large-scale generation and transmission systems. Emphasis is on applications of computer-based methods to power-system problems.

 

Prerequisites

ECE 305 or equivalent coverage of the following prerequisite topics:

  1. Steady-state analysis of single-phase and three-phase circuits
  2. Elements of transient analysis and rudimentary electromagnetic field theory
  3. Principles of electric machines, transformers, and transmission lines
  4. Per-unit system and representations
  5. Please also review ECE 301 (Linear Systems) for definition of a vector, a matrix, matrix sum and products, determinants, matrix inverse

Textbooks 

Grainger, John J., and William D. Stevenson. Power system analysis. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1994.

Course Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Build basic understandings on modern power system operation and protection
  • Master basic modeling technics for power system analysis
    • Modeling of power system apparatus (transformers, motors, transmission lines)
    • Single and three phase systems
  • Power flow analysis
    • Bus admittance matrix
    • Power flow solution
  • symmetrical and unsymmetrical fault calculations
  • Economic Dispatch and Unit Commitment

 

Grading Policy

Attendance is expected at each lecture of this course. There will be weekly problem assignments. Fold your homework papers together (stapling is recommended) and print your name on the outside. Homework papers will be collected at the beginning of class on their due dates. Late homework will not be accepted. Students are encouraged to collaborate sensibly on homework keeping in mind that quizzes and exams are closed-book.

 

There will be one class project, a midterm and a final exam. The weight for each is as follows:  Homework: 24%;   Class Project: 12%;  Midterm: 24%;   Final: 40%. Homework will be graded by the Teaching Assistant (TA) if one is assigned; questions regarding homework should be directed to the instructor.  The instructor will also grade quizzes and Final Exam and the design project.  Please see your instructor if you have questions about grading.

 

Only the University approved reasons will be accepted for missing an exam (See http://www.ncsu.edu/policies/academic_affairs/pols_regs/REG205.00.4.php). A make-up exam will be administered at the mutual convenience of the student and the Instructor. In all cases, signed documentation must be provided to the Instructor and attached to the make-up exam in order to obtain credit.

 

Reading Assignments

The reading assignments are given in the Lecture Schedule. Reading the assignments before coming to the lectures can be very helpful.

 

Software needed

Matlab and Power World will be the main computational tool for both the homework and the project.

Each student may also be required to use a general-purpose analysis computer program for either power flow or fault analysis and design of a representative electric-power transmission network.